jumpin punkins

All censorships exist to prevent anyone from challenging current conceptions and existing institutions. All progress is initiated by challenging current conceptions, and executed by supplanting existing institutions. Consequently, the first condition of progress is the removal of censorship.

— For Banned Books Week, George Bernard Shaw (above) and other literary icons on censorship (via explore-blog)


cinephiliabeyond:

Here’s a screenwriting gold: Shinobu Hashimoto & Akira Kurosawa & Hideo Oguni’s screenplay for Ikiru. Translated by Donald Richie [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). Thanks to mypdfscripts’ Sheridan. The DVD of the film is available at the Criterion Collection. Also, for your reading pleasure — Ikiru exhibitor manual; Kurosawa on Kurosawa, and other documents.

Considered by some to be Akira Kurosawa’s greatest achievement, Ikiru presents the director at his most compassionate — affirming life through an exploration of a man’s death. Takashi Shimura portrays Kanji Watanabe, an aging bureaucrat with stomach cancer forced to strip the veneer off his existence and find meaning in his final days. Told in two parts, Ikiru offers Watanabe’s quest in the present, and then through a series of flashbacks. The result is a multifaceted look at a life through a prism of perspectives, resulting in a full portrait of a man who lacked understanding from others in life.


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

Here’s a screenwriting gold: Shinobu Hashimoto & Akira Kurosawa & Hideo Oguni’s screenplay for Ikiru. Translated by Donald Richie [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). Thanks to mypdfscripts’ Sheridan. The DVD of the film is available at the Criterion Collection. Also, for your reading pleasure — Ikiru exhibitor manual; Kurosawa on Kurosawa, and other documents.

Considered by some to be Akira Kurosawa’s greatest achievement, Ikiru presents the director at his most compassionate — affirming life through an exploration of a man’s death. Takashi Shimura portrays Kanji Watanabe, an aging bureaucrat with stomach cancer forced to strip the veneer off his existence and find meaning in his final days. Told in two parts, Ikiru offers Watanabe’s quest in the present, and then through a series of flashbacks. The result is a multifaceted look at a life through a prism of perspectives, resulting in a full portrait of a man who lacked understanding from others in life.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:


Neil Young - Computer Age

With a nod to Kraftwerk, Neil Young blew some minds on his full-synth album Trans (from 1982.) It’s a glorious hybrid and an exemplar of one of my favorite themes: the blending of the past and the future into something strange and new.



"I set out to make movies about girls from the girl’s point of view … a lot of films celebrate women, but most of the time it is men doing the talking, so it ends up being a man’s perspective on women, rather than an authentic experience of being female." - Céline Sciamma, director of Water Lilies, Tomboy and Girlhood.

"I set out to make movies about girls from the girl’s point of view … a lot of films celebrate women, but most of the time it is men doing the talking, so it ends up being a man’s perspective on women, rather than an authentic experience of being female." - Céline Sciamma, director of Water Lilies, Tomboy and Girlhood.

(Source: howtocatchamonster)